Skip to content

Equipment List & Post Guide

As I work through this collection, I am taking photographs and documenting my experiences, the items that are documented are highlighted in blue, clicking on the blue text will take you to the relevant post (I hope).

Here are some pictures of most of this collection:

Here is information on testing, reforming and replacing electrolytic capacitors:

Oscilloscopes:

Tektronix:
511A
547 (2) (One donated by Walter Clay)
545A (Donated by John Ferrell)
535, 535A
310 & 310a
316 (Donated by Kenneth Kuhn), 317
561A (4), 564B Storage Oscilloscope
214 Miniature Storage Oscilloscope
475

Tektronix Plug Ins:

500 Series; 1A1 (3), 1A2, 1A4, CA (2), D, M, 53/54B (identical to Type B)

560 Series; Y: 2A63, 3A1 (2), 3A3, 3A6, 3A74
X: 2B67 (3), 3B1, 3B3 (2), 3B4

AN/USM; OS-34/USM-32 (Dumont),  OS-8E/U (Carol Electronics), AN/USM-24, AN/USM-117C, AN/USM-38

Cossor 1035 MKIII

Heathkit; IO-14

HP; 180A, 180TR, AN/USM281122A, 150A with 152A plug in

Hickok 1805A

Hughes Memoscope 104D

Knight KG-630

Siemens; Oscillarzet 05

Solartron; CT 436, CD 568

Telequipment; S31

Triumph; Oscillograph / Wobbulator 830 (Naval CTU-60018)

Signal Generators (and function generators):

GenRad; 1001-A, 1210-C (with 1201-B PSU), 1217-B (with 1201-B PSU), 1310A

HP; 8601A, 211A, 205AG

Tektronix; 106, 161 + 162 + 163 (with 160A PSU), 190 A&B Constant Amplitude, 191 Constant Amplitude

B&K; 4040A

Dubrow; TS-452C/U (Mechanical wobbulator)

Time Mark Generators: Tektronix; 180A, 181A

Frequency Counter: Tektronix CFC250, HP 500B

Spectrum and Distortion Analysers:

HP; 3580A, 339A, GR 1568-A

Heathkit; IM-5248, Nelson-Ross; Model -021 (plug in for 561A)

Impedance Bridge: GenRad; 1650A
LC Meter: Tektronix Type 130

Vacuum Tube Voltmeter: TS-375 A/U, HP 400H

Micro Volt-Ammeter: HP 425A

Grid Dip Oscillator: Heathkit; GD-1B

Receiver: Hallicrafters SX-71, Bush AC91

Transceiver: Heathkit; SB-102

Tube Testers: Hickok; 600, Mercury; 1000

DVMs: B&K; 2879 & 2707A, HP; 3468A

Multi-Meter: Triplett 630-NA, AVO8 MKV

Power Supplies:

High Voltage (for tube circuits): HP; 712B, Lambda; Model 71, Kepco; Model 400 (donated by John Dahlman)

Low Voltage: HP; 6268, Lambda; LPD 422 FM

10 Comments
  1. Dave Haas permalink

    Hi,

    I’m looking at dozens of old Weston and Westinghouse meters dating from at least as far back as the 1930s, although most are probably from the 50′s.

    Is there anyone who collects/museums these things? I’d like to give them to a loving home or find out if they have any value but I really don’t know how to go about doing this. SO far I haven’t had much luck…lots of sites dedicated to HP, Tek, and yours to “instruments”, but I don’t see anything like the frequency standard calibrated in 1937 that sitting in front of me. Can you point me at anyone who’d be interested?

    • Hi Dave.
      The best suggestion I have is Ebay, if you have the patience. Another possibility is to join vintageradio.com there is a classifieds section. There are other similar forums in this genre that may work.
      One of my concerns is preventing my collection from ending up in the landfill when my time comes. This is an issue.
      If you have a list of the items that you have, I could post then here with you email address. Obviously what happens thereafter is up to you.
      Photos are crucial.
      Richard

  2. Colin Lamb permalink

    Hello Richard:

    I found a USM-32 cathode follower probe in stuff I am cleaning out. It needs a new home and will travel postage paid to a new home. I see you have one of these scopes.

  3. Hi Richard, I like your site & especially your comments. I have an unusual request. I have an old Scott 340A Receiver & want to add a separate FM Multipath monitor. Would my Waterman S-10-A work? I’m told I need a X/Y scope that runs from DC to 50Khz. I can’t afford a McIntosh etc. Nick

    • Hi Nick.
      Thanks for the compliments. I am not familiar with the FM multipath monitor technology and so cannot be of much help. Similarly, I am not familiar with the specification of the Waterman though it is likely that the Y response will be better than 50kHz but will not be DC coupled. Does it have an input to the X-amplifier? If so, Again I would expect 50kHz be within range but not DC. Frankly, the way to go it to try it. Also, I am not sure why DC response is required?
      Richard

  4. Mark permalink

    Richard,
    I was given three CRTs that I cannot find any specs and would like to know if you have or know of where I can get them. You seem to have better resources than I do for finding information. They are: Electronix Tube Corp. 54DGP11, Dumont F777o-0P31 and 20th Century Electronics Ltd. S6D. The last is from England with the contacts on the outside of the base. The first is a 4 gun, the second is a 2 gun. Both of these have the deflection plates connections going to connectors on the neck. Thanks.
    Mark

  5. Hello, Richard. I just read with some enjoyment your tale of the 80 meter loop antenna. This caused me to be curious about your other writings, and I discovered your tale of the “Heathkit IO-14″ oscilloscope, and your question about why it might have vertical delay lines. I owned this scope for a number of years, and the purpose of the delay lines in the vertical channel was to allow the triggered sweep to get underway and the beam to become un-blanked before the vertical signal deflection began to occur. ( This way the scope could trigger on the rise of a pulse, AND display the entire baseline and rise of the pulse that caused the triggering ). Prior to the Heathkit IO-14 I used an Allied Radio Knight-Kit 5 inch synchronized free-running sweep scope. As a sixth grader, that Knight-Kit scope gave me great insight for many years, but I later learned, in the Air Force, about triggered-sweep scopes and wanted to get a better scope, hence the Heathkit IO-14. Today, I am still using a Tektronix 2215.

    Jerry AB3SX ( retired engineer, 38 yrs DOD + 4 yrs USAF )

    • Hi Jerry.
      I understand the point of the delay line, it is just that the performance of the IO-14 is so poor that the inclusion of delay lines seems to me to have been a selling point, not an actual performance benefit. (I did all that I could to restore the performance without actually replacing all the components!)
      I have a video that compares triggered to repetitive sweep on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ql1_zJjrNww
      Best,
      Richard

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: